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Published on September 18, 2020

10 Questions with Sarah York

10 Questions with Sarah Yorke

Sarah York always wanted to return Cape Cod and its positive vibe. Today, the off-site patient access supervisor shares that good feeling every day.

1. If you could have another career, what would it be?

Honestly, I really couldn’t see myself working in a career that was not in healthcare. I wanted to do something that was involved in helping people. I love interacting with people and helping them – impacting people lives.

The only change I’d make is to get an office that wasn’t directly under a staircase. [laughs] When people try to find me, we tell them, “It looks like a supply closet, but that’s where her office is!”

2. What are you most excited about?

What I am most excited about in my work life is CCHC changing over to Epic. I used Epic at Brigham and Women’s hospital, so I am looking forward to implementing Epic here at CCHC. I believe that change is a good thing, so I am looking forward to all of the exciting things that are going to take place with Vision 20/22.

In my personal life, I am excited about my first year on Cape Cod as a homeowner! I’m originally from Sandwich and just recently bought a house in Sandwich in February. It’s great being back home!

3. If you could only eat one food forever, what would it be?

Ooh, I’d say nachos. You can change them to any type of topping – do what you want!

4. What are you putting off at the moment?

I’m putting off unpacking my house. I have managed to unpack everything except my summer clothes. My boyfriend and I have lived together for a while, (but) I don’t want him to know how many clothes I have! No, it won’t really be a surprise to him…

5. Favorite binge-watch?

I love Law and Order SVU – even if I’ve seen it before, I watch it. Once you start watching an episode you have to finish it. Next thing you know, it’s eight episodes later.

6. What’s your best high school memory?

My favorite high school memory was graduation. Not only was it the start of the next chapter of my life, but I no longer had to wake up at 5 a.m. for school. I attended a private high school in Braintree, so every day I drove into school with the Boston traffic and left school with the Boston traffic.

7. Name something you can’t do.

I can’t rollerblade or ice skate. I have taken lessons and I just can’t do it. I have two brothers that played hockey and I could never keep up with them. Every year when we went on a winter vacation to New Hampshire or Vermont, I would be holding onto the boards during family skate night.

8. What song is stuck in your head at the moment?

[no hesitation] September. Earth Wind and Fire.

9. What’s one thing everyone should have in their kitchen?

An air fryer. I use my air fryer so much that I asked for a second for my birthday this year. I use the air fryer every single day!

10. What life advice would you give people?

You can do anything that you set your mind to. Especially at times like these, it’s difficult to see the good in life, but positivity and drive can make all the difference.

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